*..Drinking cranberry juice can be effective in preventing Urinary tract infections.* Think it’s a heart attack? Call an ambulance, then chew one full strength (325mg) ASPIRIN tablet or else chew 4 low dose (81mg) ASPIRIN tablets. *..Supplementing blood pressure medicines with folate containing food materials or tablets has shown to reduce the likelihood of developing stroke in future. *.. A minimum of 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week or 20 -30 min every other day has shown to improve blood pressure in hypertensive patients. *.. Mindfulness: A popular meditation technique has shown to reduce levels of stress hormone levels known as Cortisol and help in increasing attention span. *.. Worsening of Anxiety, agitation, restlessness in a previously healthy individual may be due to an overactive thyroid gland. Consult your doctor about thyroid function test.

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Dengue Fever

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Dengue Fever

What is Dengue Fever? Dengue fever also known as breakbone fever is an acute communicable disease caused by virus. Infectious Agent: Dengue virus (types 1,2,3,4) Vector/ Virus Carrier Dengue virus is spread by bite of mosquito Aedes aegyptii. Mode of Transmission Signs & Symptoms First 4 days High grade fever. Abdominal pain & Vomiting. Muscle pain/ joint pain/ Back pain/ Eye pain. Conjunctival Redness. 4th-7th Days Decrease in body temperature.  Unstable Blood Pressure.  Abdominal pain & Vomitting.  Decreasing Pulse Pressure.  Blood vomiting/ Red or Dark colour stools.  Pin point skin bleeding (petechiae)/ Bruising/ Nasal bleeding.   RED FLAG In few cases classical dengue fever may progress to Dengue Haemorrhagic fever which can cause BLEEDING from MULTIPLE SITES, WOSENING BP finally leading to SHOCK & DEATH.   SUSCEPTIBILITY & OCCURRENCE All persons are equally susceptible

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Tag : Dengue, Dengue Fever

Osteoporosis

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Osteoporosis

  What is osteoporosis? Our body is always simultaneously building new bone and tearing down old bone. For most of our lives, the two processes are in balance. But as we get older, many of us start tearing down more bone than we produce. If the loss becomes too great, it may cause osteoporosis—brittle bones that break easily. Both men and women lose bone density at about the same rate once they reach ages 60 to 70. One sign that osteoporosis is present is when a bone breaks easily—for instance, in a fall from a standing height. Another is a loss of height, which occurs when bones in the spine develop compression fractures. Osteoporosis is more likely to develop in women after menopause, smokers and heavy alcohol users, people with rheumatoid arthritis, people with close relatives who have osteoporosis, and people who take corticosteroid or thyroid medicines over a long period. Calcium and vitamin D Calcium is important for bone strength, and it’s best if it comes f

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Tag : Dengue, Dengue Fever, osteoporosis

ASTHMA

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ASTHMA

ASTHMA What is Asthma? Asthma is a chronic lung disease that inflames and narrows the airway ( tubes that bring air into and out of an individual’s lungs.) It is the most common chronic disease in children. Symptoms Wheezing Coughing Tightness in the chest Fatigue         Causes While the exact cause of asthma is not known, it is thought that a variety of factors interacting with one another, early in life, result in the development of asthma. Parents with asthma Atopy Childhood respiratory infections Exposure to allergens or infections while the immune system is developing. Asthma Triggers               Diagnosing Asthma Based on: Medical history Troublesome cough, particularly at night Awakened by coughing Coughing or wheezing after physical activity Breathing problems during particular seasons Coughing, wheezing, or chest tigh

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Tag : Dengue, Dengue Fever, osteoporosis, Asthma

Interval Traning

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Interval Traning

                          INTERVAL TRAINING FOR A STRONGER HEART                          It helps build cardiovascular fitness with shorter workouts.   Have you heard about interval training but aren’t sure how it works and whether it’s right for you? Interval training simply means alternating between short bursts of intense exercise and brief periods of rest (or a different, less-intense activity). The payoff is improved cardiovascular fitness. “Aerobic or cardiovascular training is designed to develop a healthier heart and circulatory system,” says Howard Knuttgen, research associate in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Harvard-affiliated Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and a past president of the American College of Sports Medicine. “Some regimen of aerobic training is really essential to good health.” You can give interval training a trial run simply by altering your current workout routine. To get

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Tag : Dengue, Dengue Fever, osteoporosis, Asthma, Internal Traning

Medical Myths Busted

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Medical Myths Busted

COMMON MEDICAL MYTHS MYTH 1: You can lower your risk of heart disease with vitamins and supplements. The antioxidant vitamins E, C, and beta carotene factor into lowering heart disease risk. However, clinical trials of supplementation with these vitamins have either failed to confirm benefit or were conducted in such a way that no conclusion could be drawn. The American Heart Association has stated that there is no scientific evidence to justify using these vitamins to prevent or treat cardiovascular disease. What you can do: For reasons not yet understood, the body absorbs and utilizes vitamins and minerals best when they are acquired through foods. To ensure you get the vitamins and minerals you need, skip store-bought supplements and eat a wide variety of nutritious foods of every color of the rainbow. MYTH 2: If you have smoked for years, you can’t reduce your risk of heart disease by quitting. The benefits of quitting smoking start the minute you quit,

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